What is a DNS server?

The DNS protocol is a server whose primary task is to convert a site identifier into an IP address. In simple terms, the DNS distributor works like a directory that a computer would look up when connecting to a second computer on a network. In other words, DNS allows a website to be associated with an IP tag, just as a telephone directory associates a customer's name with its telephone number.

Who are the founders?

Created in 1983 on the initiative of Jon Postel and Paul Mockapetris, DNS has become indispensable to Internet navigation. Each ISP has its own DNS servers, whose IP addresses often look like a succession of numbers (194.158.122.10 for example). To find out more about DNS, visit: https://www.what-you-must-know.com/ he registration of a domain name (such as 'mydomain.com') is done with a 'registrar', an intermediary organisation between domain name applicants (or holders) and ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers), a non-profit corporation responsible for allocating IP addresses worldwide via the domain name system.

The 'name resolution' function

The domain name system was set up to identify various websites in a more basic way: it consists of a mechanism for "translating" IP entries, addresses that are assigned exclusively to each device connected to the Internet (IP entries are in some ways similar to telephone numbers). The translation procedure is known as domain name determination and needs to be well controlled (like a telephone number which leads to the establishment of the right communication). ICANN's role is to ensure that the name resolution process runs smoothly.